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, and everything, they give big tax breaks for the oil companies. the big manufacturers. they're taking jobs away from us. and why they think it is best to do that. i need an answer to that, because i work 40 years of my life, and now i'm disabled. and now they're talking about cutting everything. i just don't think -- i've even put my life on the line for this country, vietnam. why they think it's the right thing to do. host: thanks for your call. next up, a comment from hewitt, texas. tony, a republican there. good morning. caller: good morning. how's everybody there this morning? host: it's a little hot both temperature-wise and internally i think here. caller: yeah. you know, we deal with a few facts here this morning. that cut, cap and balance that was passed did two things that everybody just is totally bent out of shape about. one of which is that it would raise the debt ceiling, and we would give that community organizer everything he wanted. it also, at the time, would say that the united states would even have a downgrade in its debt rating. and what do we do? well, you got the presiden
's the big question, right? >> looking at the influence of the freshmen today, in general they believe and have very involved local voters to back them up that they were elected in 2010 with a mission to, reign in big government, specifically big government spending, and this debt ceiling debate fits right into that. here's more from one freshman tea partier. >> it would allow the debt ceiling to go up, but only if we had significant cuts, statutory caps and balanced budget amendment and there's a growing movement with that. we met with leadership, we met with majority leader eric cantor and were trying to impress upon them that we need to be for something as republicans, we need to define what we're for. >> senator paul says this is a fight, quote, too important to give up. jon. jon: what kind of influence do the new members have, though? >> well, republicans are in the minority and the senate, so less there, but in the house they're in the majority and tea partiers, or those who agree with the tea party on fiscal issues, among the 87 how freshmen have not been shy about staking their
. is that realistic at this point. >> well, in terms of getting that big agreement, it looks highly unlikely at this point, but certainly as you pointed out, the president joking that his campaign was built on hope and change. it will be interesting to see if that hope will also win out in this debate. but, look, what the president is pushing for still is the biggest deal possible. he acknowledged, though, that it's hard to do that, but nonetheless, he has been telling congressional lawmakers during negotiations all this week that if they can't get the biggest deal possible to attack the problem of the debt and the deficit over the long term, then they should still be ambitious. >> we are obviously running out of time, and so what i have said to the members of congress is that, you need over the next 24 to 36 hours to give me some sense of what your plan is to get the debt ceiling raised through whatever mechanisms they can think about and show me a plan in terms of what you're doing for deficit and debt reduction. if they show me a serious plan, i am ready to move. even if it requires some
court term began, two of the big lens or person in the cases come if you protest a chemist vendor versus phelps in the videogame case from which ended at being caught brown v. entertainment software association. both of those cases brought with them the chance to explore first amendment issues in the internet era and they ended up really not doing that at all. the funeral case had a component to it involving an online screed against their parents of corporal snyder, which the court completely declined to address it all and instead look at it as a type of dinner plates. the videogame case again had the potential of looking at whether this new medium has something different than the other new media that arose over the centuries, but instead decided it did not impose either unanimous word you unanimous holdings getting to that resold. we have as well i suppose we should be grateful for arizona's contribution to the supreme court docket with the tuition tax credit case in the clean elections case which was perhaps again i say the clean elections case the perhaps most predictable outcome, the
and cuff links and cowboy boots in the ring with him. >> yahoo. >> mike: don't touch my junk food. big government getting bigger and advertisers in the food industry say they feel pressured by new federal guidelines. shouldn't parents decide what their kids eat. "fox & friends" sunday morning continues right now. ♪ >> hey, everybody, good warning by mike jarrett there. >> ainsley: good to see you. >> mike: and gets better looking every week. >> dave: you, too, sweetheart. >> ainsley: we're glad to be waking you up this morning. hope your family is doing well. >> dave: the best news for all of you saturday night we thought a big deal was going to happen. and now it appears that a smaller deal is on the way because john boehner late last night made the announcement that we're giving up talks on that grand deal that's been discussed where republicans would give in on tax hikes, democrats would give in on entitlements and this guy what john boehner had to say. >> now, we can't agree if there's any new taxes involved and of course on the other side the democrats say here we go. >> so, bo
a story saying that big mortgages are back. the financial times and its financial section has two stories of highlights, one talking about stress tests and you may have remembered those from a few years ago done in the united states to test the fiscal capabilities of u.s. banks. this takes a look at european banks. but the one story from new york this morning looks at city baverbing looking at their profits, surging 24% to $3.3 billion. city results mirrors jp morgan. we have been talking about the notion of comfroms when it comes to discussions about the debt and should congress members of the congress republicans primarily as far as these discussions go, and the president, compromise on their ideals when it comes to debt talks? all available for you to join us. e-mail and twitter as well. new jersey. go ahead. caller: good morning. i would just like to say that i wish that the congress would do like the president said and try to put aside their issues just this once. so that the country can be saved economically. i'm so tired of the posturing that they continue to do in the house of rep
the big fight's going going to be over the debt ceiling limit. that's where the hard negotiations are going to be put out. and then they will probably be given a new number, and they'll have to revisit that bill that they've worked on in committee and meet the new number. so if that's what happens, it's probably a good thing. host: so first things first. guest: look, here's what each department or each function of government is going to be getting, and then work out what you think you can get, the most bang for the buck, so to speak. host: let's get to calls for you. we're going to begin with a call from los angeles. michelle is a democrat there. you're on for david keating of the club for growth. caller: given that you made the comments about t republican candidate mitt romney has developed an unshakable reputation as a flip-flop per uses federal powers to coerce taxpayers, and tim pawlenty is hard to pin down, who do you like? guest: well, what the club for we haveohas been doing, published a series of white papers on many of the presidential candidates, all of those that have d
targeted, it's basically not a big deal, now he's realized what a catastrophic error of judgment that was because the woman that's replaced him on this inquiry, sue acres, is saying up to 4,000 people could have been targeted by the newspapers. >> what about the implications that this is not just the now defunct "news of the world," but other papers? >> yeah. i think this is really significant and really bad news for news international. it's no longer just confined to "news of the world," the paper that they closed down, realizing it had become toxic as a brand. it's now spread to "the sun" and "sunday times." both so far have not been shown to have used phone hacking, but they have been shown to use what, at best, slightly underhand techniques, at worst illegal activities to get information. "the sun" is maintaining it got the medical records without breaking the law. "the sunday times" saying there was a legitimate public interest in looking into gordon brown's bank details and so on on a tip, but there was some sort of corruption there or something which was all proved to be u
. hi honey! ♪ h-o-t-w-i-r-e... ♪ hotwire.com >>> no progress reported tonight on the big deficit reduction talks at the white house. with that, this warning tonight from moody's investor service. the federal government could lose its top of the line credit rating if the white house and congress can't agree on a plan to increase the nation's debt ceiling, meaning allow washington to borrow more money to help pay its bills. that warning came just a few hours after this sober math lesson from the fed chairman ben bernanke. since the government borrows 40 cents of every dollar it spends, a fall you'ilure to increase washington's credit limit would require a 40% cutback in spending. >> significant cuts in social security, medicare, military pay, or some combination of those in order to avoid borrowing more money. >> now that sounds ominous, but some conservatives think the catastrophe scenarios are exaggerated. >> if congress fails to raise the debt ceiling by $2.5 trillion, that somehow the united states will go into default, and we will lose the full faith and credit of the united s
at the start of the american revolution. sure our children have asthma but big business gets to pump more pollution into our air. sure our water is tainted, but special interests get to dump s. yes, our endangered species slowly fading away, but now we can drill in their habitat. what happens, mr. speaker when our air becomes too dirty to breathe, when our water becomes too dirty to drink and when our wildlife all go extinct? i urge a no vote on this bill, but before i close, i would like to remind my colleagues across the aisle that the captain always goes down with the ship. and that's the real deal. . the chair: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentlelady from texas rise? the gentlelady is recognized for five minutes. ms. jackson lee: colleagues, mr. chairman, if i might, i wanted to start by acknowledging the loss of our valiant capitol police, officer jacob j. chestnut and detective john gibson of which were honored today and just wanted to acknowledge the men and women of the united states capitol police for their service and my sympathy, again, to the families o
boehner has proposed. boehner has a pretty big job on his hands of maintaining that republican unity that we have seen so far at a time when democratic kennedy is coalescing because of anger over how these talks have gone. host: alexander blogging, thank you. our question this morning is, with the debt limit is affecting more financial decisions. let's go to cleveland, ohio on the democratic line. caller: good morning. host: is it affecting your financial decisions? caller: at this point, no permit but i am living on a fixed income. i am very much worried about whether or not this debt limit will be raised or not to coz i know the treasury department is going to have to make some decisions if it is not raced. i am confident social security recipients will receive their cash benefits. i am also confident those who are desperately in need of their money will receive their benefits. i am confident president obama and the democratic party are going to look out for the needy but i am highly unsettled about what is going on. mr. bolton made the fact that i do not think this debt limit is s
that is to come together in a bipartisan way around a big deal, around $4 trillion in savings at least. the senator from colorado went in some detail into the bipartisan debt and deficit commission. chaired bier sin bowles and alan simpson, and the 11 members of that commission, ems of members of this body currently serving senators, republican and democrat, who came together around a plan that would make $4 trillion in savings over the next decade. i think we should do no less than that. and i think the plan that we should be working on in detail now should include all four major areas where we have to have savings. reductions in discretionary domestic spending, reform to our entitlement programs, reductions in pentagon spending, and increases in federal revenue through tax reform. all four of these have to be on the table. in my view, our values ask no less than that. as we work through a recovery, we need to continue to invest in education, in infrastructure, in innovation, but we also need to responsibly put together a bipartisan path that will take on the sacred cows of this insti
to see the quick video i promised. jfc engages a big tent of stakeholders, a big tent in shake holders because as i mentioned, a broken framework fabric of society requires as i mentioned a patchwork of everybody being brought together. not just a small group, not just one small sector, not just the military or not just the political actors but all the sectors coming together including the community, government, society, all people who need to buy into this system and be part of it and agree. and have that social contract. and the week before last, we published a case study, it's thick, a case study on jsd and tleeshsz a smaller version on our website but we tried someone who was involved walk step-by-step to paint the picture and just distill it and just a few policy recommendations. jsd, despite its name dialog is not just talking. it's not just talking and then leaving. it's really a vehicle or a means to do things that are vital to strengthening rule of law and post-conflict environment. there are a number of different things. it all has to be dependent upon the country context and
, was part of another big debate over federal spending. and out of that came the graham-hollings legislation. we talked to him on camera. here's just a clip of his comments on washington today. >> nothing gets done. the atmosphere is the game. the game is re-election. you've got to get the money for re-election. in other words in 1998, 12 years ago, i had to spend -- i had to raise, excuse me, $8.5 million. now, $8.5 million is $30,000 every week, each week for six years. it's not just raising money the year ahead. it's raising it for all six years. and you're raising it not only for yourself because your colleagues will help you, the committees will want to keep that seat. so when your time is up. so you are always out there raising money. and the name of the game is make no mistake, play the fence when you get back to washington. got no idea of paying the bill. they haven't paid the bill for 10 years. host: fritz hollings will be 90 later this year. expressing his frustration. he's part of the many voices we will include in our "charleston weekend" on "book tv" and "american history tv." a
, in exchange for big, big spending cuts. but, the white house knew that a lot of republicans including speaker john boehner thought it would be irresponsible to not -- raise the debt ceiling and go past the limited and on the other hand, the white house is insisting on a long term deal to get it passed the election, and, republicans know that they cannot reject a deal too, voy default now, just so they can get it passed the election and if there is an actual deal that is -- for 6 months the white house will have to accept it. so, both sides have these weakness in their bargaining positions. >> jamie: byron york of the washington examiner, i know you wrote a great piece on this yesterday and we'll follow your commentary how things are going in washington. thanks for weighing in, today. >> thank you, jamie. >> eric: right now it is ten at night in hong kong and 11:00 at night in tokyo and, in hours when the traders wake up and go to work, what will happen? all eyes are anticipating what could happen when trading beginnings in the asian markets, anxiety of a possible massive sell off is running o
they weren't going to pay their taxes? of course they'd be in big trouble. and the senate is not in trouble but the country is in trouble because the senate is not doing its job and neither the house nor the senate did its job in the last congress for the first time ever and that's how we go into three years since we had a work document that we should have to work with. and what do we do this week? the disappointment to all three of us is we said we wanted to stay this week and deal with these issues. we started out trying to deal with the libya resolution which apparently wasn't important enough to deal with last thursday when we were going to take a week to work in our states. and then when people on the republican side said we really think we ought to be debating the reason we were supposed to stay, we still don't do that. we have this amendment -- i think it was supposed to be and is a sense of the senate that millionaires aren't paying enough taxes. now, we all understand -- we all understand the politics of that, just like we understand the politics of no accelerating depreciation for
this from the beginning. it's an intriguing day. >> this is, it's a big day. >> dave: let's start with the defense. what can they do? is there anything they can stress that would perhaps save her life? is there any chance of a not guilty verdict in your opinion? >> i don't think there's any chance of a not guilty. i think the best they can do is to save her life. the defense made outrageous claims in opening, but went the other way with their defense and helped the prosecution and sputtered to the close and the rebuttal is the final knockout punch. >> clayton: is there enough for the death penalty? that seems to be the question. because premeditation is ultimately the linchpin and maybe that's taken off the table. >> i don't think so. although it isn't a sure fire went for the first degree. what happened here, i think, what you're going to have is that if jeff ashton, if he puts this together in the right way for the jury and really kind of shows them what they can disregard and why, i think they still have a great chance because the biggest thing for the first degree murder conve
company called two men with big hearts moving and storage. but he fell behind in his bills to this company. this storage company because of medical bills that had piled up for him. >> so he just passed away and the family is trying to figure out what they're going to do at the funeral and what they would like to do is get a hold of some of his military stuff, including his two purple hearts but the problem is that particular company is owed by the family $600. the family went over and talked to them and they knocked it down to $500. but nonetheless, they would like to have the stuff for the funeral next tuesday but they got to come up with $500. here's the son of the veteran. >> he was a very patriotic person. >> dad wanted to go out in a blaze of glory. that was on the back of the fire truck. something we want to give for dad. that was one of his last requests. >> he had it for five years. it would be thousands of dollars. don kennedy owns the company so he's not going to release the stuff as of right now unless they pay the $500 which is just -- they just want to get the -- they want t
that he likes to call a big deal. anyone who's looked at the figures knows that it isn't. but the larger point here is that the american people have already won this debate. no one, not even the president, can claim to support the status quo anymore, even when in fact he does. but of course winning the debate isn't nearly as important as achieving the reforms that are needed to convince the world that we're actually serious about getting our fiscal house in order. that's why republicans continue to hold out for significant reforms and that's why we'll continue to fight for serious long-term reforms this week. republicans have tried to persuade the president of the need for a serious course correction, but weeks of negotiations have shown that his commitment to big government is simply too great to lead to the kind of long-term reforms we need to put us on a path to both balance and economic growth. so we've decideed to bring our case to the american people. the president recently cited a poll that suggests americans want to see balance in this debate. i'd point him to another poll showin
this is not a big deal? $800 million of aids has been suspended. >> both sides are working together on a number of things and pakistan is not happy with the pace of delivery of assistance. americans are not happy with the pace of delivery of certain deliverables from pakistan. it happens sometimes. right now because pakistan is a fledgling democracy and everything that happens there hits the media and there's an american domestic political context in which everything becomes an issue because of the way people react to your administration. this has become -- >> the reaction in pakistan to the u.s. decision to suspend at least for now $800 million in promised aid, a spokesman for the pakistani military saying in the past, we have not been dependent -- we have not been dependent on any external support for these operations. and they will. >> in 1999 there was no aid relationship. even though the u.s. and pakistan continued to work together albeit in a limited manner. it's not a good idea. it insults the people of pakistan. >> $800 million is a lot of money that can be used to build schools here in
if they succeed, our country succeeds. the country expects us to do that. i hope we think big and swing for the fences and get a result and bring it back to us and let us consider it and hopefully enact it and get on to other things. the debt is a major long term problem. not just for our grandchildren, but for us today. we have a bigger issue facing us. that is the fact that we've had persistent unemployment and an economy that's not growing and that's hurting too many people. the sooner that we swing for the fences and get a result and get our debt under control and deal with it in a bipartisan way, better for the country and the quicker we'll be able to get on to the larger question of jobs. of course, economist have made it clear to us getting the debt under control has a lot to do with jobs. that when our total debt is as high as it is today, nearly 100% of the gross domestic product, that probably costs us a million jobs a year. we can't solve all of that in one day, or one month. but we can take a big step in the right direction. that's really what our country men and women want
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)

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